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SUBMIT
 
 
 
 
 
Not so long ago, YouTube decided that it is a very smart idea to not let videos on a specific channel be sorted by date from old to new, because everyone should consume only fresh content, and the author's old works are not so important. Thus, YouTube will once again proves the fears about what this platform is turning into. But despite this, there are a lot of creators on YouTube who enthusiastically talk about the things they are a part of, share information and even teach. So sometimes it is very important for me to have access to the channel videos in chronological order. Unfortunately, there are no solutions on YouTube itself anymore, so I had to figure out some by myself.
I am using Python at work a lot. Mostly to automate routines. So I did some experiment and I got it out of control a bit. So now this is a finished solution... kind of.
So check this article if you want to know more and try it yourself.
UPD: So YouTube put "Oldest" button back. What do you know about time wasting?
 
 
 
All articles on my site is just a extensionless UTF-8 files with plain text that defines content and "Jinja" macros tags that defines templating of this content. It helps me to avoid usage of the messy databases, using file system instead to create, keep and edit information. Text, Images and related files of particular article storing in the same article folder and in the same time folder with articles folders also separated from the main site sources. Yes, I know that this solution may look weird but it helps me to keep this portal as simple to manage as possible: on lightweight handmade CMS, without admin section, without WYSIWYG tools... on one small flash drive. And just because all this is literally just a text file, I can edit it in most simple text editing tools... like SublimeText3 which I'm using right now.
The biggest problem of this solution that once plain text and "Jinja" tags are mixing up all this soup becomes pretty hard to read. Sure, there are special "Jinga" syntax linter existing but it helps to determine where text and where "Jinga" macros tag is, but it's not helping to determine which particular "Jinja" macros tag it is: paragraph, image, link... etc. and for formating of the article on the go it's highly important. After small research I found out how to create custom syntax that will adjust whole work space for specific needs of this syntax. In this topic I am going to show you most simple and minimalistic case that can be imagined. Also it will be completely independent from all other settings.
 
 
 
 
 
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